MIKE MENDEZ'S TOP TEN CINEMA OBSCURITIES

Not only is the director of the ghostly creepfest Gravedancers a madman, but he is also a huge horror movie geek. Despite having to take care of an unbelievable, and some would say unrivaled, action figure collection, the man behind the balls-to-the-wall demon nun flick The Convent has thrown together his top ten favorite obscure cinema delights for you to track down and watch. After you're done watching his recommendations, keep an eye out for his newest films, the nightmare fuel that is Mega Spider and the soon-to-be-lensing Overkill!

1. Tetsuo: The Iron Man: "As surreally weird as Eraserhead and as intense as a Novocainless tooth extraction...sci-fright as only the Japanese can do it." -Richard Harrington, Washington Post

2. Santa Sangre: "...is a throwback to the golden age, to the days when filmmakers had bold individual visions and were not timidly trying to duplicate the latest mass-market formulas. This is a movie like none I have seen before, a wild kaleidoscope of images and outrages, a collision between Freud and Fellini. It contains blood and glory, saints and circuses, and unspeakable secrets of the night. And it is all wrapped up in a flamboyant parade of bold, odd, striking imagery, with Alejandro Jodorowsky as the ringmaster." -Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun Times

3. Ginger Snaps: "This film is the perfect mix of casting, writing and directing, which is truly a rare experience these days, and such a treat when it works to this magnitude. Ginger Snaps consists of some very smart writing, and doesn't succumb to the self referential quips like all those post Scream knock-offs." -Lawrence P. Raffel, Monstersatplay.com

4. Red, White & Blue: "...it isn't happy, it is extremely violent...can possibly break your brain." -Harry Knowles, Aintitcool.com

5. The Day Of The Beast: "Gore, sacrilege and twisted humor are the basic ingredients...Spiked with extreme violence and frantic, over-the-top performances, The Day of the Beast is loud and chaotic and desperately determined to shock." -Edward Guthmann, San Francisco Chronicle

6. The Prowler: "What makes this movie unique is the way in which the murders are so graphically and brutally shot. A lot of time in slasher pics from this era, the camera would pull away and the kill would happen off screen because the ratings board would never give it an R rating if they didn’t, but not here. These kills are shown in all of their gory glory and the camera NEVER pulls away. In fact the kills are shoved in your face to where you can’t escape them!" -Fiend of Grue, Fatally-yours.com

7. The Deadly Spawn: "It's amateurism may be a turn-off for some, but Spawn's ambition can't be denied, it sinks its teeth into your attention span like one of the titular bite-sized creatures nibbling on a tea party guest's ankle...lovingly gruesome." -Johnny Butane, Dreadcentral.com

8. Madman: "When Madman isn't focusing on some corny dialog or playing some downright goofy country western songs in the background, it has a genuinely creepy atmosphere. A tall, fat, lumbersome killer in appearance that can swiftly kill victims with a surprisingly mighty force, the Madman makes for a memorable and scary on screen villain." -Bigdaddyhorrorreviews.com

9. The Derk Backward: "It’s essentially a John Waters movie, only more deadpan and without Waters’ mitigating affection. It's one of the films you might catch late at night and not quite believe you're seeing what you're seeing." -Rob Gonsalves, efilmcritic.com

10. Dogs: "...the whole movie we have insane dogs on a rampage. Barking left. Growling right. Jumping up. Crouching down. And basically killing all humans...Best ending of a movie I’ve seen in a long time." -Vomitron, cultreviews.com



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